unix

OS User role separation for Golden Gate administration...

We have many fingers in the pie where I work. Silos, silos everywhere. The DBA Group is responsible for operations and performance. ETL Admins are responsible for data movement. For a number of reasons we cannot allow the ETL Admins to log in directory as Oracle user. This is what I came up with to make everyone happy.

What is an ETL admin?

Our ETL Admins are users who do not need DBA or ROOT type access, they just need to run ggsci, start stop processes, edit config files, and check status of how things run.

Quickie script to run dbv on your database...

This script will generate dbv commands into a shell script and then execute the shell script. run-dbv.sql:
set head off
set lines 200
set feedback off
set define off
spool dbv.sh

select 'dbv file='||name||' blocksize = '||block_size||
       ' LOGFILE=FILE-'||FILE#||'.LOG' from v$datafile;
spool off

host chmod 755 dbv.sh
spool dbv_results.log
host ./dbv.sh
spool off
Output will be created as separate log files. You can run it and review results like this:
$ sqlplus "/ as sysdba" @run-dbv.sql

PuTTY Helper

PuTTY is a free implementation of Telnet and SSH for Win32 and Unix platforms along with an xterm terminal emulator. It is one of my must-have utilities that I use when administrating Unix boxes. If you are using PuTTY on Windows you should check out PuTTY Session Manager. It is a utility that acts as a 'Launcher' for PuTTY sessions. It reads your configured saved sessions and allows you to organize them into folders and launch multiple PuTTY sessions at once. You can download the latest version of PuTTY Session Manager here: http://puttysm.sourceforge.net/

The fuser unix/linux command...

I colleague turned me on to a helpful command the other night. Where I work we have an archived log based replication system. It was way behind on processing and the replication process doesn't give any indication of what log its currently chewing on. /sbin/fuser to the rescue!
  • 1) 'cd' to a directory where you want to check the files
  • 2) run '/sbin/fuser *' to discover what processes are touching files in the directory
[oracle@test /] cd /u01/app/oracle/oradata/TEST
[oracle@test TEST] ls redo*
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Automagically Graphing on Linux

So my last post was about administration on Linux. After running Oracle on Windows for way too many years we migrated our Oracle systems to 64-bit Linux over the past year.

Now that we're on Linux I needed a lightweight way to capture and graph some performance data. The performance data was a mix of OS utilities and 3rd party utilities, but all the utilities output text, so I knew I could screen scrape the output, massage it a little, and save the data to a file. After I had the data in a file I knew I could run it through GnuPlot to graph it.
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